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Redfish
Red Fish

Red Drum - Sciaenops ocellatus
Family Sciaenidae, DRUMS
The crown jewel of shallow water fishing in Florida. Redfish are a hearty, powerful, fast, and cunning inshore species. They are a prized catch to any angler, and often inhabit the same stretches of water as Snook and can be caught with the same techniques. However, Redfish can often been seen feeding and holding in such shallow water that the tips of their tails stick out of the water (termed "tailing"). This offers a unique opportunity to sight fish up-close and personal with a highly prized gamefish. Redfish can be taken on a variety of baits, artificial, live, and dead, depending on the time of year, and situation.
Snook
Snook

Common Snook - Centropomus undecimalis
Family Centropomidae, SNOOKS
Snook are tenacious fighters, offering head-shaking jumps, searing runs, and pitbull-like determination. They are often found on shallow ledges, drop-offs, in potholes, and hanging out under mangrove. They are year-round residents to this area of Florida, but their feeding will ebb and flow with the changing water temperature. One of the things that makes Snook such a great target species is their readiness to strike artificials, live, and even dead bait in so many different fishing situations. Snook are a prized table fare when they are in season and of legal size (currently 28"-33"). Currently, the season is closed. FWC is keeping the season closed due to extremely harsh winter a few years back. We are anxiously anticipating the reopening. Three United States Navy submarines have been named for this species, USS Robalo (SS-273) and USS Snook (SS-279) in the Second World War and USS Snook (SSN-592) in the 1950s
Shark
Shark

Family--SPHYRNIDAE
The oceans apex predators. Sharks are an often over-looked gamefish in some area of the country. Southwest Florida anglers are generally not among these people. The shark fishing here varies through out the year from really, really good to downright stellar. During Tarpon season, throngs of monster sized sharks move into the area to feed on the migrating Tarpon....yes, that's right ...sharks that can often be seen in Boca Grande Pass eating 150lb+ tarpon in a matter of seconds. Lemon, Bulls, Hammerheads (a recent world-record was set in Boca Grande Pass at over 1200lbs) Blacktip, Spinner, Dusky, and even a very rare Tiger Shark can be found in these waters. The type of fishing done for these sharks varies throughout the year but generally consists of large live or dead baits and "Key West Style" chumming. Light tackle shark fishing counts among one of the most thrilling and fulfilling endeavors an angler can under take. There are many line-class and all-tackle world records capable of being broken in the area, don't be afraid to ask about them and give it a shot if the timing looks right!
Tarpon
Tarpon

Tarpon - Megalops atlanticus
Family Elopidae, TARPON
TARPON - Strength, stamina, and fighting ability, make the Tarpon one of Florida's premier game fish. Anyone who has fought a tarpon, large or small, knows they exert a tremendous amount of effort during an angling event. Fossil research shows that tarpon have been swimming in our oceans since prehistoric times and can reach sizes up to 8 feet and can weigh up to 280 pounds. Due to its majestic appearance of size and color, the Tarpon is nicknamed "Silver King." Tarpon are primarily found in shallow coastal waters and estuaries, but they are also found in open marine waters, around coral reefs, and in some freshwater lakes and rivers. Tarpon can only be fished recreationally in Florida. The majority of recreational anglers practice catch and release since the fish is not considered to be of any food value.
Grouper
Grouper

Gag - Mycteroperca microlepis
Family Serranidae, SEA BASSES AND GROUPER
There are many Grouper species that inhabit Florida waters, and almost all of them make terrific table fare. These bottom-dwellers are generally found around submerged structure in deeper waters. In Southwest Florida, most species spend their adult lives in the open Gulf of Mexico, but tend to move much closer to shore as the waters cool in the winter. This is true of Gag, Black, Red, and scamp groupers. However, it is the mighty Goliath Grouper, the largest fish to inhabit inshore waters (often reaching weights of over 600lbs) that will haunt your dreams after you tangle with one. Goliath Grouper are a protected species which cannot be harvested, but this does not stop them from providing what can only be described as a brawl with anglers who dare to test them. The most terrific part about these behemoths is that they inhabit mainly shallow inshore and nearshore waters, and are almost always hungry. For those of you who pride yourself on tangling with the biggest and strongest fish that swim, the Goliath Grouper should be right in your sights as a target species, or just a side trip. Be prepared, dealing with these giants is not for the faint of heart, and only for the physically fit.
Black Drum
Black Drum

Black Drum-pogonias cromis
*Florida Record: 93 lbs.
The largest member of the drum family; spawns nearshore in winter and early spring; feeds on oysters, mussels, crabs, shrimp and occasionally fish; longevity to 35 or more years. These are almost gentle eaters, just a slight tug on your line and its hooked. Then the fun begins. They will definitely give you a run for your money. Once aboard, you can hear the drum roll. Very exciting and a fish not to be ignored. Found many times in brackish waters.

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